Futurelearn
date_range Starts on June 6, 2016
event_note End date June 9, 2016
list 3 sequences
assignment Level : Introductive
chat_bubble_outline Language : English
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Key information

credit_card Free access
verified_user Free certificate
timer 12 hours in total

About the content

Delve into the seedy underbelly of the art world, looking at smuggling, theft, fakes, and fraud, with this free online course.

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Syllabus

The devastation caused by the trafficking of illicit antiquities and the theft of art has gained widespread public attention in recent years. Confronted with the pock-marked “lunar landscapes” of archaeological sites in Iraq and Syria, freshly decapitated Buddha sculptures in Cambodia and empty frames on the walls of museums, we face a difficult question: how do we protect our heritage from theft, illegal sale, and destruction? In Antiquities Trafficking and Art Crime we will tackle this question together. Shed light on the grey market for stolen art On this free online course, taught by researchers from the Trafficking Culture international research consortium and hosted by the University of Glasgow, you will gain a better understanding of: the criminal networks that engage in antiquities trafficking and art crime; the harmful effects that these phenomena have on communities and society as a whole; and what scholars, police, and lawmakers are doing to protect our heritage. By combining cutting-edge research in the fields of criminology, archaeology, anthropology, sociology, art history, museums studies, and law, we will shed light on the grey market for stolen art. Learn how and why art is stolen, trafficked, found, and returned In Week 1, we will track how ancient artefacts are looted from archaeological sites, trafficked across multiple international borders, and end up in the possession of some of the world’s most respectable museums and collectors. In Week 2, we will learn about crimes of fine art: heists, fakes, and vandalism. In Week 3, we will discuss the ethical, legal, and emotional issues associated with the return of stolen cultural objects. Art and antiquities represent our collective cultural identity and crimes against art affect all of us. When an artefact is looted or an artwork is stolen, we have ALL been robbed. We must work together to protect our heritage before it is too late. Antiquities Trafficking and Art Crime is a great first step. If you want to find out more about the financial implications of art crime, have a look at this blog post from Meg Lambert: Does art crime pay? 5 stolen artefacts and what they sold for.
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Platform

FutureLearn is a massive open online course (MOOC) learning platform founded in December 2012.

It is a company launched and wholly owned by The Open University in Milton Keynes, England. It is the first UK-led massive open online course learning platform, and as of March 2015 included 54 UK and international University partners and unlike similar platforms includes four non-university partners: the British Museum, the British Council, the British Library and the National Film and Television School.

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