date_range Débute le 1 septembre 2016
event_note Se termine le 4 novembre 2017
list 6 séquences
assignment Niveau : Introductif
chat_bubble_outline Langue : Anglais
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Les infos clés

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En résumé

This MIT and Harvard co-taught course examines Japanese history and uncovers the skills and questions involved in reading history through digital imagery. The introductory module considers methodologies historians use to “visualize” the past, followed by three modules that explore the themes of Westernization, in Commodore Perry’s 1853-54 expedition to Japan; social protest, in Tokyo’s 1905 Hibiya Riot; and modernity, as seen in the archives of the major Japanese cosmetics company, Shiseido.

The course will cover the following topics in four modules:

  • Module 0: Introduction: New Historical Sources for a Digital Age (Professors Dower, Gordon, Miyagawa). Digitization has dramatically altered historians' access to primary sources, making large databases of the visual record readily accessible. How is historical methodology changing in response to this seismic shift? How can scholars, students, and the general public make optimal use of these new digital resources?
  • Module 1: Black Ships & Samurai (Professor Dower). Commodore Matthew Perry's 1853-54 expedition to force Japan to open its doors to the outside world is an extraordinary moment to look at by examining and comparing the visual representations left to us by both the American and Japanese sides of this encounter. This module also addresses the rapid Westernization undertaken by Japan in the half century following the Perry mission.
  • Module 2: Social Protest in Imperial Japan: The Hibiya Riot of 1905 (Professor Gordon). The dramatic daily reports from participants in the massive "Hibiya Riot" in 1905, the first major social protest in the age of "imperial democracy" in Japan, offer a vivid and fresh perspective on the contentious domestic politics of an emerging imperial power.
  • Module 3: Modernity in Interwar Japan: Shiseido & Consumer Culture (Professors Dower, Gordon, Weisenfeld). Exploring the vast archives of the Shiseido cosmetics company opens a fascinating window on the emergence of consumer culture, modern roles for women, and global cosmopolitanism from the 'teens through the 1920s and even into the era of Japanese militarism and aggression in the 1930s. This module will also tap other Visualizing Cultures units on modernization and modernity.

The course is based on the MIT "Visualizing Cultures" website devoted to image-driven research on Japan and China since the 19th century (visualizingcultures.mit.edu).

NOTES:

UTokyo001x and UTokyo002x: Visualizing Postwar Tokyo, Parts 1 & 2 by University of Tokyo, follow in this series.

For MIT students: VJx will continue to be part of 21F.027J Visualizing Japan in the Modern World, a residential course taught by Professor Miyagawa in Fall semesters.

In addition to MITx and HarvardX, this project is supported by the U.S. Japan Foundation, the University of Tokyo, and the Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University.

MITx requires individuals who enroll in its courses on edX to abide by the terms of the edX honor code. MITx will take appropriate corrective action in response to violations of the edX honor code, which may include dismissal from the MITx course; revocation of any certificates received for the MITx course; or other remedies as circumstances warrant. No refunds will be issued in the case of corrective action for such violations.

Learners who register for an MITx open online course agree to participate in research intended to improve MITx's offerings and to improve education generally. As a part of this research, learners may be experience variation in course material. MITx may share the information gathered during an MITx course, including personally identifiable information, with researchers both within and outside of MIT. All disclosures of information will be in compliance with applicable law and will be subject to an agreement to protect the data being disclosed. MITx may publicly share aggregated data that does not personally identify learners, and any research findings will also be presented in a way that does not identify individual learners. Please refer to the edX Privacy Policy for more information and/or report your experience through the edX contact form.

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Le programme

  • Methodologies to "visualize" Japanese history between the 1850s and 1930s
  • An understanding of Westernization, social protest, modernity in Japanese history through digital imagery
  • Strategies for learning--and teaching--history through visual sources
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Les intervenants

  • John W. Dower
  • Andrew Gordon
  • Shigeru Miyagawa
  • Gennifer Weisenfeld
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Le concepteur

L’université Harvard (Harvard University), ou plus simplement Harvard, est une université privée américaine située à Cambridge, ville de l'agglomération de Boston, dans le Massachusetts. Fondée le 28 octobre 1636, c'est le plus ancien établissement d'enseignement supérieur des États-Unis.

Elle fait partie de l'Ivy League, regroupement informel des huit universités de la côte Est des États-Unis. Plus de 70 de ses étudiants ont reçu un prix Nobel. Le corps enseignant est constitué de 2 497 professeurs, pour 6 715 étudiants de premier cycle (undergraduate, en anglais) et 12 424 étudiants de cycle supérieur (graduate en anglais). Harvard attire des étudiants du monde entier (132 nationalités représentées en 2004).

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La plateforme

EdX est une plateforme d'apprentissage en ligne (dite FLOT ou MOOC). Elle héberge et met gratuitement à disposition des cours en ligne de niveau universitaire à travers le monde entier. Elle mène également des recherches sur l'apprentissage en ligne et la façon dont les utilisateurs utilisent celle-ci. Elle est à but non lucratif et la plateforme utilise un logiciel open source.

EdX a été fondée par le Massachusetts Institute of Technology et par l'université Harvard en mai 2012. En 2014, environ 50 écoles, associations et organisations internationales offrent ou projettent d'offrir des cours sur EdX. En juillet 2014, elle avait plus de 2,5 millions d'utilisateurs suivant plus de 200 cours en ligne.

Les deux universités américaines qui financent la plateforme ont investi 60 millions USD dans son développement. La plateforme France Université Numérique utilise la technologie openedX, supportée par Google.

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