Probabilistic Graphical Models 2: Inference
date_range Débute le 13 mars 2017
event_note Se termine le 17 avril 2017
list 5 séquences
assignment Niveau : Introductif
label Informatique & Programmation
chat_bubble_outline Langue : Anglais
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3.8 /5
Avis de la communauté
17 avis

Les infos clés

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En résumé

Probabilistic graphical models (PGMs) are a rich framework for encoding probability distributions over complex domains: joint (multivariate) distributions over large numbers of random variables that interact with each other. These representations sit at the intersection of statistics and computer science, relying on concepts from probability theory, graph algorithms, machine learning, and more. They are the basis for the state-of-the-art methods in a wide variety of applications, such as medical diagnosis, image understanding, speech recognition, natural language processing, and many, many more. They are also a foundational tool in formulating many machine learning problems. This course is the second in a sequence of three. Following the first course, which focused on representation, this course addresses the question of probabilistic inference: how a PGM can be used to answer questions. Even though a PGM generally describes a very high dimensional distribution, its structure is designed so as to allow questions to be answered efficiently. The course presents both exact and approximate algorithms for different types of inference tasks, and discusses where each could best be applied. The (highly recommended) honors track contains two hands-on programming assignments, in which key routines of the most commonly used exact and approximate algorithms are implemented and applied to a real-world problem.

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Le programme

  • Week 1 - Inference Overview
    This module provides a high-level overview of the main types of inference tasks typically encountered in graphical models: conditional probability queries, and finding the most likely assignment (MAP inference).
  • Week 1 - Variable Elimination
    This module presents the simplest algorithm for exact inference in graphical models: variable elimination. We describe the algorithm, and analyze its complexity in terms of properties of the graph structure.
  • Week 2 - Belief Propagation Algorithms
    This module describes an alternative view of exact inference in graphical models: that of message passing between clusters each of which encodes a factor over a subset of variables. This framework provides a basis for a variety of exact and approximate inferen...
  • Week 3 - MAP Algorithms
    This module describes algorithms for finding the most likely assignment for a distribution encoded as a PGM (a task known as MAP inference). We describe message passing algorithms, which are very similar to the algorithms for computing conditional probabilitie...
  • Week 4 - Sampling Methods
    In this module, we discuss a class of algorithms that uses random sampling to provide approximate answers to conditional probability queries. Most commonly used among these is the class of Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithms, which includes the simple G...
  • Week 4 - Inference in Temporal Models
    In this brief lesson, we discuss some of the complexities of applying some of the exact or approximate inference algorithms that we learned earlier in this course to dynamic Bayesian networks.
  • Week 5 - Inference Summary
    This module summarizes some of the topics that we covered in this course and discusses tradeoffs between different algorithms. It also includes the course final exam.
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Le concepteur

The Leland Stanford Junior University, commonly referred to as Stanford University or Stanford, is an American private research university located in Stanford, California on an 8,180-acre (3,310 ha) campus near Palo Alto, California, United States.
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La plateforme

Coursera est une entreprise numérique proposant des formation en ligne ouverte à tous fondée par les professeurs d'informatique Andrew Ng et Daphne Koller de l'université Stanford, située à Mountain View, Californie.

Ce qui la différencie le plus des autres plateformes MOOC, c'est qu'elle travaille qu'avec les meilleures universités et organisations mondiales et diffuse leurs contenus sur le web.

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Le meilleur avis

I kind of like the teacher. She can always explain complicated things in a simple way, though the notes she writes in the slides are all in free style. Loopy belief propagation and dual decomposition are the best things I've learnt in this course. I've met them before in some papers, but I found it extremely hard to understand then. Now I gain some significant intuition of them and I'm ready to do further exploration. Anyway, I'll keep on learning course 3 to achieve my first little goal in courser.

le 31 janvier 2018
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le 31 janvier 2018

I kind of like the teacher. She can always explain complicated things in a simple way, though the notes she writes in the slides are all in free style. Loopy belief propagation and dual decomposition are the best things I've learnt in this course. I've met them before in some papers, but I found it extremely hard to understand then. Now I gain some significant intuition of them and I'm ready to do further exploration. Anyway, I'll keep on learning course 3 to achieve my first little goal in courser.

le 23 décembre 2017

Unlike other Coursera courses, this specialization covers a lot of conepts accompanied with programming assignments. Since the programming assignments are pre-filled, its a bit tough to understand the style. It would be great if some form of explanation if offered.

le 28 novembre 2017

great course, though really advanced. would like a bit more examples especially regarding the coding. worth it overally

le 28 octobre 2017

Perhaps the best introduction to AI/ML - especially for those who think "the future ain't what it used to be"; the mathematical techniques covered by the course form a toolkit which can be easily thought of as "core", i.e. a locus of strength which enables a wide universe of thinking about complex problems (many of which were correctly not thought to be tractable in practice until very recently!)...

le 24 octobre 2017

Unfortunately, in my opinion, this course is not as well structured as the first course (PGM1: structure). There are some bugs/issues with the PAs code that should have been fixed and the course material could focus a bit more on the case of continuous random variables (which are almost ignored throughout the course). It is still a great and totally worth it course, though. Highly recommended for machine learning post-graduate students.

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