Intro to AJAX
list 2 séquences
assignment Niveau : Introductif
chat_bubble_outline Langue : Anglais
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Les infos clés

credit_card Formation gratuite

En résumé

In this course you will learn how to make asynchronous requests with JavaScript (using jQuery’s AJAX functionality), and gain a better understanding of what’s actually happening when you do so. You will also learn how to use data APIs so you can take advantage of freely accessible data in your applications, including photo results, news articles and up-to-date data about the world around us. As part of the course, you’ll be building a web app that will help people learn about a place where they want to move! Your app will query the Google Streetview, Wikipedia and New York Times APIs! This course is also a part of our Front-End Web Developer Nanodegree.

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Le programme

Inspiration

* What is AJAX? * Why use an API? * How can you identify AJAX requests in existing websites?

Perspiration

* Clone the Move Planner repository * Implement the Google Streetview API * Implement the NY Times API * Error handling normal AJAX requests * Implement the Wikipedia API * Error handling JSON-P requests

Meditation

* What did you learn? * How else can you apply AJAX to make speedy page loads? * Go customize!
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Les intervenants

  • Cameron Pittman - A passionate educator and programmer, Cameron lives and breathes web development as he creates programming courses at Udacity. Before coming here, Cameron was a combination Director of Content and web developer at Seattle startup LearnBIG. He taught four years of high school physics and chemistry in Nashville, TN, during which time he pioneered teaching physics with the video game Portal 2. Cameron graduated with a degree in physics and astronomy from Vanderbilt University and earned his master's in teaching from Belmont University.
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La plateforme

Udacity est une entreprise fondé par Sebastian Thrun, David Stavens, et Mike Sokolsky offrant cours en ligne ouvert et massif.

Selon Thrun, l'origine du nom Udacity vient de la volonté de l'entreprise d'être "audacieux pour vous, l'étudiant ". Bien que Udacity se concentrait à l'origine sur une offre de cours universitaires, la plateforme se concentre désormais plus sur de formations destinés aux professionnels.

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