date_range Débute le 27 janvier 2014
event_note Se termine le 10 mars 2014
list 6 séquences
assignment Niveau : Introductif
chat_bubble_outline Langue : Anglais
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Les infos clés

credit_card Formation gratuite
verified_user Certification gratuite
timer 12 heures de cours

En résumé

In this course we will learn about the features of higher education that were designed specifically to prepare workers and leaders for the Industrial Age, and we’ll strategize ways that, together, we can change learning--inside of school and out--for the world we live in now--and even to help improve our world. #FutureEd

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Le programme

Learning Objectives

  • Understand how and why we inherited the Industrial Age educational systems.
  • Think deeply about the requirements of the world we live in now.
  • Discover new ideas, methods, competencies, and subject matter.
  • Share our pathways to successful innovation with others around the world. Together, we can change schools, classrooms, institutions, learning--and maybe ourselves!  

WEEK ONE - January 27, 2014
Guiding Principles and Driving Concepts - Let’s Get Started

This week we will think about the uses of history: learning how and why educational institutions were constructed in the past helps us think about what we need now, in order to begin to shape a different future of education in order to help shape a more just future for all.

WEEK TWO - February 3, 2014
The iPod Experiment: Or, Learning vs. Education

Duke University’s iPod experiment became international news.  Why?  What happens when students are in charge?  What happens when education begins at a place where no one (not even the instructor) knows the answer in advance? What if the actual learning cannot be tested or assessed by the usual methods of higher education? What if learning is also about trying to improve the status quo?  This week we will look at diverse histories and theories of education and learning.

WEEK THREE - February 10, 2014
Teaching Like It’s 1992    

The World changed on April 22, 1993, when the scientists at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications released the Internet and the World Wide Web to the general public.  From then on, anyone with access to an Internet connection could communicate  to anyone else with an Internet connection.  No editor or publisher provides a safety net now and, at the same time, our data can be hacked, our privacy invaded.  The digital world we live in now comes with tremendous responsibilities and opportunity--and yet it comes with real inequalities, perils, and obstacles too.  Does our educational system prepare us for these challenges?

WEEK FOUR - February 17, 2014
Welcome to the Future: 10 Ways to Change the Paradigm of Higher Education

We will now be looking at different principles, methods and metrics for redesigning an innovative form of learning that helps us all navigate the complexities of the world we inhabit outside of school.  This week we focus specifically on innovations to the curriculum.

WEEK FIVE - February 24, 2014
Innovations in Pedagogy (Methods) and Assessment

This week we will focus on innovations in pedagogy (the methods for learning) and assessment.  How you teach is what you teach.  And, we need to think deeply about what we value and make sure what we value is what we count.    

WEEK SIX - March 3, 2014
How to Make Institutional Change
 
Even if we make changes in our personal learning and teaching methods, we still have to work mostly within institutions of learning.  Institutional change can be difficult; it takes patience, strategy, and allies. This week offers (and also invites) ideas about what we can do together. It makes a powerful argument that we all need to advocate (in any country) for higher education and shows how, in the U.S., the decline in support for public education has contributed to income inequality and hurt all our future.  This week includes interviews with inspiring people who have worked together to make successful change happen in society ad in education, against odds.  

Conclusion: Thank you for joining this movement on behalf of educational innovation and reform!  This is not the end.  It’s the beginning.  Where will we do from here? Let’s get started! 

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Les intervenants

  • Cathy Davidson - Co-Director of the PhD Lab in Digital Knowledge
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Le concepteur

Duke University has about 13,000 undergraduate and graduate students and a world-class faculty helping to expand the frontiers of knowledge. The university has a strong commitment to applying knowledge in service to society, both near its North Carolina campus and around the world.
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La plateforme

Coursera est une entreprise numérique proposant des formation en ligne ouverte à tous fondée par les professeurs d'informatique Andrew Ng et Daphne Koller de l'université Stanford, située à Mountain View, Californie.

Ce qui la différencie le plus des autres plateformes MOOC, c'est qu'elle travaille qu'avec les meilleures universités et organisations mondiales et diffuse leurs contenus sur le web.

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