date_range Débute le 2 mars 2015
event_note Se termine le 13 avril 2015
list 6 séquences
assignment Niveau : Introductif
chat_bubble_outline Langue : Anglais
card_giftcard 10.8 points
- /5
Avis de la communauté
0 avis

Les infos clés

credit_card Formation gratuite
verified_user Certification gratuite
timer 18 heures de cours

En résumé

This course explores how teachers can capitalize on what students bring to the classroom - their ideas, perceptions, and misunderstandings - to advance the learning of all students in the class, a practice we call “leveraging student thinking”.

more_horiz Lire plus
more_horiz Lire moins
dns

Le programme

This course justifies and unpacks a teaching practice we call leveraging student thinking.  This practice (actually a constellation of practices) supports important educational goals including, but not limited to, achievement as outlined in the Common Core State Standards. The elements of leveraging are: 

  • eliciting student thinking 
  • attending to significant features of that thinking 
  • interpreting students' ideas within a developmental framework
  • bridging from students' current understandings to more sophisticated understandings
Over the course of four lessons we will explore each element listed above. We will be drawing upon both our own* and others' research,as well as the insights of practicing teachers. 

* We are grateful to the National Science Foundation for their support of the research on which this course is based and the preparation of the materials found here:  "Linking Teacher Preparation to Student Learning in Mathematics and Science", National Science Foundation, Award ID 0554486. 

Lesson 1: Eliciting Student Thinking at the Core (available on August 19)

Goal: Design a better task -- i.e., one that will more effectively get students’ thinking on the table. 

Essential Questions: 

    •    What does it mean to leverage student thinking? 
    •    Why is leveraging student thinking educative? 
    •    How can you design tasks to more effectively elicit student thinking and make students' understandings more visible?  

Assignments: 

  • Design a task to effectively elicit student thinking.  
  • Complete survey.
Lesson 2: Anticipating and Interpreting Student Thinking (available on August 26)

Goal: Locate your students' thinking (elicited in assignment #2) within a developmental framework.  

Essential Questions: 
  • What’s the developmental trajectory that links students' current understandings of particular concepts to more sophisticated understandings? 
  • What does it mean to locate student thinking within a trajectory of development?
Assignments:  
  • Sort the student work you collected from least to most sophisticated. On what basis are you making this judgement?

  • Conduct a clinical interview with one or more of your students about a concept in your subject area and hypothesize how those students' understanding might build over time "in the direction of what the expert already knows."* 
*See Dewey, J. (1916). Democracy and Education. New York:  Basic Books, p. 191. See Barb's lecture in Lesson 2 to put this phrase in context) 
Lesson 3: Taking Up Learners’ Ideas as Pedagogical Resources (available on September 2)

Goal: Use talk and representational tools to “take up” student thinking in ways that advance the understandings of all students.  

Essential Questions: 
  • How do teachers use student thinking to build important ideas and understandings?
Assignments:  
  • Analyze a video excerpt for the moves made by the teacher and students to build students' understandings.
  • Videotape/audiotape a lesson in your classroom, and, with a peer, analyze the moves you and your students make to build understanding.
Lesson 4: Putting Will and Skill Together to Leverage Student Thinking (available on September 9)

Goal: Identify personal & professional challenges of leveraging practice (based on attempting, and reflecting critically on that attempt to leverage), and sketch a plan for your development of this practice. 

Essential Questions:
  • How and why is the diversity of student ideas and understandings a resource for leveraging? In other words, how can diversity of ideas propel learning? 
  • What are the challenges or “pressure points” that impede the practice of leveraging in general?
  • What can you do to develop this practice in your teaching context?
Assignments: 
  • Teach, videotape/audiotape, and reflect on a lesson in which you focus on building from and through students’ ideas. 
  • Develop an action plan with your partner to develop your skills in leveraging student thinking
  • Submit action plan as a peer assessment and assess the work of three of your peers. 
record_voice_over

Les intervenants

  • Barbara Stengel - Teaching and Learning
  • Marcy Singer-Gabella - Department of Teaching and Learning, Peabody College of Education and Human Development
store

Le concepteur

Vanderbilt University, located in Nashville, Tenn., is a private research university and medical center offering a full-range of undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees.
assistant

La plateforme

Coursera est une entreprise numérique proposant des formation en ligne ouverte à tous fondée par les professeurs d'informatique Andrew Ng et Daphne Koller de l'université Stanford, située à Mountain View, Californie.

Ce qui la différencie le plus des autres plateformes MOOC, c'est qu'elle travaille qu'avec les meilleures universités et organisations mondiales et diffuse leurs contenus sur le web.

Quelle note donnez-vous à cette ressource ?
Contenu
0/5
Plateforme
0/5
Animation
0/5